Published On: Mon, Oct 19th, 2015

6 Creepy Abandoned Mansions From Around the World

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Credit: Alexander Synaptic / Flickr

By: Kaitlyn Johnston

These grand estates once played host to the wealthiest of families. Now, they house dark memories, crumbling architecture – and maybe even ghosts. Watch your step as we venture inside 6 abandoned mansions from around the world.

1. THE MUDHOUSE MANSION OF OHIO

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Credit: AColvin / Flickr

Depending on who you ask, this Ohio mansion was built in the 1840s, 50s, 70s, or possibly around the 1900s. Regardless of when the first owner moved in, multiple families have since inhabited the place. Perhaps it’s the mansion’s uncertain history that inspires the mysterious stories connected to the home. One such tale claims that a government official used Mudhouse to hide his slaves after the Civil War. When one of the captives escaped, he murdered the entire family. Other eerie legends of mass death have been woven into the abandoned mansion’s history. It’s even known as the original home of the infamous Bloody Mary, who haunts the halls where her children were murdered. Today, the owner keeps the property private and vehemently discourages trespassing.

READ MORE: THE CURSED HISTORY OF THE LEMP FAMILY MANSION

2. THE LIU FAMILY MANSION OF TAIWAN

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Credit: Alexander Synaptic / Flickr

The Liu Family Mansion, known to the superstitious as the Minxiong Ghost House, was built in Taiwan in 1929 for a businessman and his family of eight. The family reportedly abandoned the home in the 1950s. Although the reason for their leaving is unclear, many attribute the family’s eager relocation to an unfortunate tale: The maid, love-sick for the family patriarch, drowned herself in the well, bringing bad luck on the home and everyone who lived in it. Other stories of the mansion’s history claim that the property is haunted by men of the Japanese imperial army who died in battle on the grounds.

3. THE CHATEAU MIRANDA OF BELGIUM

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Credit: foam / Flickr

Chateau Miranda – also known as Chateau de Noisy – was built in 1866 for the Liedekerke-Beaufort family. The 19th century neo-Gothic castle stands in Celles, Belgium, where the family relocated during the French Revolution. It was passed down through generations until WWII, when it was taken over by the National Railway Company of Belgium. The impressive building was used to house orphaned children until 1980. Although various organizations have made offers, wishing to return the Chateau to its former splendor, the family has refused and the once grand castle has been left to fend for itself.

READ MORE: THE WINCHESTER MYSTERY HOUSE

4. THE CAMBUSNETHAN HOUSE OF SCOTLAND

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Credit: Paradasos / Flickr

Located in North Lanarkshire, Scotland, Cambusnethan House was completed in 1820 for the Lockhart family of Castlehill. The home was built to their specifications, right down to the family crest carved over the entry and etched into each baluster of the magnificent staircase. The crest is a representation of the family’s special surname: a casket, heart, and lock. As the story goes, Lockhart ancestors carried the heart of King of Scots, Robert the Bruce, back from the Holy Land. The beautiful Gothic revival home is one the last of its kind in Scotland as many were demolished in the 1950s and 60s. All use of the building ended in 1984 due to its risky condition.

5. THE JUKUIJU OF TAIWAN

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Credit: Alexander Synaptic / Flickr

Built in 1920, this abandoned mansion can be found in the Taichung area of Taiwan. The history of the grand home is debated. Many claim the house once belonged to successful poet, Chen Ruoshi, while others say that the mansion was owned by Chen Shaozong, a wealthy businessman and landowner who was brought down by the land reform program in 1949. When Shaozong died without a will, a man named Liu bought Jukuiju. Since Liu’s death, it’s believed the house was passed to his heirs, but the estate remains abandoned. Regardless of just who holds the deed, the ruins of Jukuiju possess a beautiful combination of traditional Taiwanese and Japanese colonial era architecture.

6. VILLA DE VECCHI OF ITALY

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Credit: JJKDC / Flickr

Situated in the mountains of Lake Como, Italy, this 1800s mansion comes with a sad tale. After traveling the world and serving as a soldier, nobleman Felix de Vecchi returned to Italy and hired architect Alessandro Sidoli to build him the perfect home for his family. Unfortunately, just a year before the Villa was completed, Sidoli died, never getting to see his finished masterpiece. The tragic death seemed to spark a curse on the property. Some time later, Count de Vecchi came home to find his wife murdered and his daughter missing. After a long and fruitless search, de Vecchi committed suicide, unable to cope with the loss of his family. The Villa was passed to his brother and the family visited the home often until the 1940s. After a succession of new owners, the mansion was eventually abandoned.

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